Providing Testing Solutions

Contact Us Now: +61 (0) 8 83916844

Technical Articles

Stone as a Building Material
(With Focus on Indian Building Stone)

By Mr Abhishek Chandaliya (chandaliya.abhishek@gmail.com)
Edited by Mr Jim Mann – Stone Initiatives

1.         Introduction
Stone is the one of the major building materials. It is a versatile material and hence it can be used from the foundation to the parapet in a building and hence the scope comprises the study of use of different stones at these places.

2.         Introduction to  Rocks
Rock  (mineral),  naturally  occurring  solid  material  consisting  of  one  or  more  minerals.  Minerals  are  solid,  naturally  occurring  chemical  elements  or  compounds  that  are  homogenous,  meaning  they  have  a  definite  chemical  composition  and  a  very  regular  arrangement  of  atoms.  Rocks  are  everywhere,  in  the  ground,  forming  mountains,  and  at  the  bottom  of  the  oceans.  Earth’s  outer  layer,  or  crust,  is  made  mostly  of  rock.  Some common rocks include granite and basalt.

Natural  stone  is  used  in  building  as  a  facing,  veneer,  and  decoration.  The  major  factors  affecting  the  suitability  and  use  of  stone  fall  under  two  broad,  but  overlapping  categories:  physical  and  structural  properties  and  aesthetic  qualities.  The  three  factors  of  building  stone  that  most  influence  their  selection  by  architects  for  aesthetic  reasons  are  pattern,  texture,  and  colour.  Consideration  also  should  be  given  to  costs,  availability,  weathering  characteristics,  physical  properties,  and  size  and  thickness  limitations.
Stone  patterns  are  highly  varied,  and  they  provide  special  features  that  make  building  stone  a  unique  material.  Texture  is  varied,  ranging  from  coarse  fragments  to  fine  grains  and  crystalline  structures.  Texture  also  varies  with  the  hardness  of  minerals  composing  the  stone. 

Pattern,  texture,  and  colour  all  are  affected  by  how  the  stone  is  fabricated  and  finished.  Granites  tend  to  hold  their  colour  and  pattern,  while  limestone  colour  and  pattern  changes  with  exposure.  Textures  may  range  from  rough  and  flamed  finishes  to  honed  or  polished  surfaces.  The  harder  the  stone,  the  better  it  takes  and  holds  a  polish.

2.1        India’s Glorious Tradition
India's long history, dating back to 3200 B.C.  has  been  influenced  considerably  by  the  disposition,  development  and  use  of  stones  and  other  construction  materials.  Dimension  stones  have  also  left  deep  imprints  on  the  architectural  heritage  of  the  country.  Innumerable  temples,  forts  and  palaces  of  Ancient  Indian  Civilization  have  been  carved  out  of  locally  available  stones.  The  Taj  Mahal  at  Agra  stands  testimony  to  the  age  defying  beauty  of  Indian  marble.  Some  of  the  ancient  rocks  cut  wonders  are  Khajuraho  Temple,  Elephanta  Caves,  Konark  Temple,  etc.  Besides,  all  major  archaeological  excavations  have  revealed  exquisitely  carved  statuettes  and  carvings  in  Stone.  Ancient  Buddhist  monuments  like  the  Sanchi  Stupa  of  3rd  century  BC  have  also  been  carved  out  of  stone. 

This  tradition  of  Stone  Architecture  has  continued  to  the  present  era  with  most  of  the  important  modern  buildings  in  India  like  the  Presidential  House,  Parliament  House  and  Supreme  Court  made  from  high  quality  sandstone  of  Rajasthan.  The  Lotus  Temple  of  New  Delhi  stands  testimony  to  the  relevance  of  marble  in  modern  Indian  architecture. 

Stones  are  still  the  mainstays  of  civil  construction  in  India,  with  stones  being  used  extensively  in  public  buildings,  hotels,  temples  etc.  It  is  increasingly  being  used  in  homes,  with  the  use  of  stones  now  penetrating  amongst  the  burgeoning  middle  class  of  India.

GEOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION OF ROCKS

1. Igneous  Rocks
2. Sedimentary  Rocks
3. Metamorphic  Rocks

Igneous Rocks
Igneous  rocks  are  rocks  formed  from  a  molten  or  partly  molten  material  called  magma.  Magma  forms  deep  underground  when  rock  that  was  once  solid  melts.  Overlying  rock  presses  down  on  the  magma,  and  the  less  dense  magma  rises  through  cracks  in  the  rock.  As magma moves upward, it cools and solidifies.  Magma  that  solidifies  underground  usually  cools  slowly,  allowing  large  crystals  to  form.  Magma that reaches Earth’s surface is called lava.  Lava  loses  heat  to  the  atmosphere  or  ocean  very  quickly  and  therefore  solidifies  very  rapidly,  forming  very  small  crystals  or  glass.  When  lava  erupts  at  the  surface  again  and  again,  it  can  form  mountains  called  volcanoes.

Igneous  rocks  commonly  contain  the  minerals  feldspar,  quartz,  mica,  pyroxene,  amphibole,  and  olivine.  Igneous rocks are named according to which minerals they contain.  Rocks  rich  in  feldspar  and  quartz  are  called  felsic;  rocks  rich  in  pyroxene,  amphibole,  and  olivine,  which  all  contain  magnesium  and  iron,  are  called  mafic.  Common  and  important  igneous  rocks  are  granite,  rhyolite,  gabbro,  and  basalt.  Granite and rhyolite are felsic; gabbro and basalt are mafic.  Granite has large crystals of quartz and feldspar.  Rhyolite is the small-grained equivalent of granite.  Gabbro has large crystals of pyroxene and olivine.  Basalt is the most common volcanic rock.

Sedimentary Rocks
Sedimentary rock forms when loose sediment, or rock fragments, hardens.  Geologists place sedimentary rocks into three broad categories: 
1)       clastic  rocks,  which  form  from  clasts,  or  broken  fragments,  of  pre-existing  rocks  and  minerals
2)       chemical  rocks,  which  form  when  minerals  precipitate,  or  solidify,  from  a  solution,  usually  seawater  or  lake  water;  and 
3)        organic  rocks,  which  form  from  accumulations  of  animal  and  plant  remains.  It  is  common  for  sedimentary  rocks  to  contain  all  three  types  of  sediment.  Most  fossils  are  found  in  sedimentary  rocks  because  the  processes  that  form  igneous  and  metamorphic  rocks  prevent  fossilization  or  would  likely  destroy  fossils.

The  most  common  types  of  clastic  rocks  are  sandstone  and  shale  (also  known  as  mudrock).  Sandstone  is  made  from  sand,  and  shale  is  made  from  mud.  Sand  particles  have  diameters  in  the  range  2.0  to  0.06  mm  (0.08  to  0.002  in),  while  mud  particles  are  smaller  than  0.06  mm  (0.002  in).  Sand  and  mud  form  when  physical  or  chemical  processes  break  down  and  destroy  existing  rocks.  The  sand  and  mud  are  carried  by  wind,  rivers,  ocean  currents,  and  glaciers,  which  deposit  the  sediment  when  the  wind  or  water  slows  down  or  where  the  glacier  ends.  Sand  usually  forms  dunes  in  deserts,  or  sandbars,  riverbeds,  beaches,  and  near-shore  marine  deposits.  Mud  particles  are  smaller  than  sand  particles,  so  they  tend  to  stay  in  the  wind  or  water  longer  and  are  deposited  only  in  very  still  environments,  such  as  lake  beds  and  the  ocean  floor.

Sedimentary rock forms when layers of sand and mud accumulate.  As  the  sediment  accumulates,  the  weight  of  the  layers  of  sediment  presses  down  and  compacts  the  layers  underneath.  The  sediments  become  cemented  together  into  a  hard  rock  when  minerals  (most  commonly  quartz  or  calcite)  precipitate,  or  harden,  from  water  in  the  spaces  between  grains  of  sediment,  binding  the  grains  together.  Sediment  is  usually  deposited  in  layers,  and  compaction  and  cementation  preserve  these  layers,  called  beds,  in  the  resulting  sedimentary  rock.

The  most  common  types  of  chemical  rocks  are  called  evaporates  because  they  form  by  evaporation  of  seawater  or  lake  water.  The  elements  dissolved  in  the  water  crystallize  to  form  minerals  such  as  gypsum  and  halite.  Gypsum  is  used  to  manufacture  plaster  and  wallboard;  halite  is  used  as  table  salt.

The most common organic rock is limestone.  Many  marine  animals,  such  as  corals  and  shellfish,  have  skeletons  or  shells  made  of  calcium  carbonate  (CaCO3).  When  these  animals  die,  their  skeletons  sink  to  the  seafloor  and  accumulate  to  form  large  beds  of  calcium  carbonate.  As  more  and  more  layers  form,  their  weight  compresses  and  cements  the  layers  at  the  bottom,  forming  limestone.  Details  of  the  skeletons  and  shells  are  often  preserved  in  the  limestone  as  fossils.

Coal is another common organic rock.  Coal  comes  from  the  carbon  compounds  of  plants  growing  in  swampy  environments.  Plant  material  falling  into  the  muck  at  the  bottom  of  the  swamp  is  protected  from  decay.  Burial  and  compaction  of  the  accumulating  plant  material  can  produce  coal,  an  important  fuel  in  many  parts  of  the  world.  Coal deposits frequently contain plant fossils.

Metamorphic Rocks
Metamorphic  rock  forms  when  pre-existing  rock  undergoes  mineralogical  and  structural  changes  resulting  from  high  temperatures  and  pressures.  These  changes  occur  in  the  rock  while  it  remains  solid  (without  melting).

The  changes  can  occur  while  the  rock  is  still  solid  because  each  mineral  is  stable  only  over  a  specific  range  of  temperature  and  pressure.  If  a  mineral  is  heated  or  compressed  beyond  its  stability  range,  it  breaks  down  and  forms  another  mineral.  For  example,  quartz  is  stable  at  room  temperature  and  at  pressures  up  to  2  Gigapascals  (corresponding  to  the  pressure  found  about  65  km  [about  40  mi]  underground).  At  pressures  above  2  Gigapascals,  quartz  breaks  down  and  forms  the  mineral  coesite,  in  which  the  silicon  and  oxygen  atoms  are  packed  more  closely  together.

In  the  same  way,  combinations  of  minerals  are  stable  over  specific  ranges  of  temperature  and  pressure.  At  temperatures  and  pressures  outside  the  specific  ranges,  the  minerals  react  to  form  different  combinations  of  minerals.  Such combinations of minerals are called mineral assemblages.

In  a  metamorphic  rock,  one  mineral  assemblage  changes  to  another  when  its  atoms  move  about  in  the  solid  state  and  recombine  to  form  new  minerals.  This  change  from  one  mineral  assemblage  to  another  is  called  metamorphism.  As  temperature  and  pressure  increase,  the  rock  gains  energy,  which  fuels  the  chemical  reactions  that  cause  metamorphism.  As  temperature  and  pressure  decrease,  the  rock  cools;  often,  it  does  not  have  enough  energy  to  change  back  to  a  low-temperature  and  low-pressure  mineral  assemblage.  In  a  sense,  the  rock  is  stuck  in  a  state  that  is  characteristic  of  its  earlier  high-temperature  and  high-pressure  environment.  Thus,  metamorphic  rocks  carry  with  them  information  about  the  history  of  temperatures  and  pressures  to  which  they  were  subjected.

The  size,  shape,  and  distribution  of  mineral  grains  in  a  rock  are  called  the  texture  of  the  rock.  Many metamorphic rocks are named for their main texture.  Textures give important clues as to how the rock formed.  As  the  pressure  and  temperature  that  form  a  metamorphic  rock  increase,  the  size  of  the  mineral  grains  usually  increases.  When  the  pressure  is  equal  in  all  directions,  mineral  grains  form  in  random  orientations  and  point  in  all  directions.  When  the  pressure  is  stronger  in  one  direction  than  another,  minerals  tend  to  align  themselves  in  particular  directions.  In  particular,  thin  plate-shaped  minerals,  such  as  mica,  align  perpendicular  to  the  direction  of  maximum  pressure,  giving  rise  to  a  layering  in  the  rock  that  is  known  as  foliation.  Compositional  layering,  or  bands  of  different  minerals,  can  also  occur  and  cause  foliation.  At  low  pressure,  foliation  forms  fine,  thin  layers,  as  in  the  rock  slate.  At medium pressure, foliation becomes coarser, forming schist.  At high pressure, foliation is very coarse, forming gneiss.  Commonly,  the  layering  is  folded  in  complex,  wavy  patterns  from  the  pressure.

 

DIFFERENT TYPES OF STONES        

Igneous Rocks 
2.3.1.    Granite
Granite  is  an  igneous  rock,  ordinarily  composed  of  feldspar,  mica,  and  silica  or  quartz.  It  is  formed  by  the  cooling  and  crystallization  of  matter  below  the  earth's  surface  under  conditions  of  heat  and  pressure  which  do  not  obtain  in  the  case  of  lava  ejected  on  the  surface  in  a  molten  state.  It  is  found  in  the  eastern  part  of  the  United  States,  in  Canada,  in  many  sections  of  the  Rocky  Mountains  and as  a  rule, wherever  the  later  rock  formations  have  been  worn  away  by  the  weather,  and  the  igneous  rock  has  been  exposed.

2.3.1.1  Planes of Fracture
The  structure  of  granite  is  quite  uniform,  but  there  are  often  planes  of  cleavage  caused  by  stresses  produced  while  the  molten  material  was  cooling.  The  plane  along  which  the  rock  can  be  split  most  easily  is  known  as  rift;  it  is  often  nearly  horizontal.  Rock  can  also  be  split  along  a  plane,  known  as  the  grain,  which  is  perpendicular  to  the  rift,  but  this  cleavage  is  not  so  easy  as  that  along  the  rift.  Sometimes,  the  stresses  are  sufficient  to  cause  fractures,  called  joints,  running  parallel  to  the  surface.

2.3.1.2  Qualities of Granite
Granite  is  one  of  the  most  valuable  stones  for  construction  purposes.  Although  the  quality  of  granite  varies  according  to  the  proportions  of  the  constituents  and  to  their  method  of  aggregation,  this  kind  of  stone  is  generally  durable,  strong,  and  hard.  The  hardest  and  most  durable  granites  contain  a  greater  proportion  of  quartz  and  a  smaller  proportion  of  feldspar  and  mica.  Feldspar  makes  granite  more  susceptible  to  decomposition  by  the  solution  potash  contained  in  it,  potash  feldspar  being  less  durable  than  lime  or  soda  feldspar.  Mica,  being  easily  decomposed,  is  an  element  of  weakness  in  granite.  An  excess  of  lime  or  soda  in  the  mica  or  feldspar  hastens  disintegration,  as  does  also  an  excess  of  iron.  Therefore,  stones  showing  large  and  dark  iron  stains  should  be  rejected  for  outside  work.  Fine-grained granite weathers better than does granite of coarser grain.

Granite has a pearly lustre.  The  colour  of  common  granite  varies  from  white  through  yellow  to  deep  red,  and  the  stone  is  generally  classified  as  gray  and  red.  Feldspar renders the stone lighter in colour.

Because  of  its  uniform  structure,  granite  can  be  quarried  in  large  blocks.  The  rift,  the  grain,  and  the  joint  planes  are  advantageous  in  quarrying,  as  it  is  very  difficult  to  cut  granite  in  other  places.  The  uses  for  which  granite  is  suitable  depend  on  the  texture  of  the  stone.  Medium-grained stone is best fitted for building construction.  Fine-grained  stone  can  be  carved  and  polished,  but,  on  account  of  its  extreme  hardness,  it  cannot  be  worked  readily.  Such  stone  is,  therefore,  costly  when  it  has  to  be  cut,  Coarse-grained  granite  should  be  used  only  for  concrete  aggregate.

2.3.2     Trap Rocks
The  term  trap  is  generally  applied  to  a  large  variety  of  dark-coloured,  igneous,  unstratified  rock~  that  occur  in  large  tabular  masses  rising  one  above  another  in  successive  steps  like  stairs.  These  rocks  consist  chiefly  of  hornblende,  lime,  feldspar,  and  augite,  with  some  magnetic  and  titanic  iron.  The  predominance  of  one  or  the  other  of  these  minerals  gives  rise  to  many  distinctive  names,  as  greenstone,  olivine,  etc.  The  colour  varies,  being  dark  gray,  dark  green,  or  nearly  black,  according  to  the  proportions  of  the  different  constituents.  The  texture  is  usually  so  fine  and  close-grained  that  the  character  of  the  structure  cannot  be  determined  by  the  naked  eye.

Trap rocks are exceedingly dense, hard, and durable.  However,  they  are  not  much  used  for  structural  purposes  because  of  their  sombre  and  unattractive  appearance,  the  great  cost  of  working,  and  the  difficulty  of  securing  large  blocks  on  account  of  the  numerous  joint  planes.  As  they  split  and  break  easily,  trap  rocks  are  extensively  used  for  paving  blocks,  for  the  aggregate  in  making  concrete,  and  for  the  construction  of  macadamized  roads,  for  which  purpose  their  fine  texture  especially  fits  them.  They are also used for railroad ballast.

 

Sedimentary Rocks
2.3.4     Sandstone
Sandstone consists of fragments of other rocks cemented together.  It  is  a  stratified  rock  and  belongs  to  the  later  geological  periods.  Most  of  the  grains  are  quartz,  but  often  feldspar  is  also  present  in  sandstone.  The  cementing  material  may  be  silica,  oxide  of  iron,  clay,  or  carbonate  of  lime.

If  the  cementing  material  is  silica,  the  rock  is  very  durable,  but  difficult  to  work.  Iron  oxide  is  a  good  cementing  material  and  gives  the  stone  a  reddish  or  brownish  colour.  Clay  is  a  satisfactory  binder,  but  it  readily  absorbs  water,  which  may  cause  destruction  of  the  stone  by  freezing.  Lime  renders  the  stone  particularly  liable  to  disintegration  when  exposed  to  an  atmosphere  containing  gases,  or  when  used  for  foundations  in  a  soil  that  contains  acid.

2.3.5     Sandstones
Are  variable  in  character,  some  being  nearly  as  valuable  as  granite  and  others  being  practically  useless  for  permanent  construction.  The  best  stone  is  characterized  by  small  grains  with  a  small  proportion  of  cementing  material.  When broken, it has a bright, clear, sharp fracture.  It  is  usually  found  in  thick  beds  and  shows  slight  evidences  of  stratification.

When  quarried,  sandstones  are  usually  saturated  with  quarry  water  and  are  very  soft;  but  on  exposure  to  the  air,  they  dry  out  and  become  hard.  Water  can  readily  penetrate  between  the  layers  of  this  stone;  therefore,  in  foundations  it  should  be  laid  on  its  natural  bed,  that  is,  in  the  same  position  that  it  occupied  in  the  quarry,  so  that  the  penetration  of  moisture  and  possible  disintegration  by  freezing  may  be  prevented  as  much  as  possible.

The  colours  of  sandstone  are  white,  cream,  yellow,  dark  brown,  blue,  and  red.  Fine-grained blue sandstone is known as bluestone.  This  variety  is  widely  used  for  trimmings  and  for  stone  sidewalks,  as  it  readily  splits  into  slabs.

2.3.6     Limestone
All  limestones  are  of  sedimentary  origin  and  have  for  their  principal  ingredient  carbonate  of  lime.  The  presence  of  other  minerals  gives  rise  to  the  division  of  the  limestones  into  five  classes,  each  of  which  is  designated  by  the  name  of  the  predominating  mineral.  When  clay  is  present,  the  stone  is  called  argillaceous  limestone;  when  silica  predominates,  siliceous  limestone;  when  iron  is  prevalent,  ferruginous  limestone;  when  magnesia  is  present  to  the  extent  of  15  per  cent,  magnesium  limestone;  and  when  the  carbonate  of  lime  and  the  carbonate  of  magnesia  are  combined  in  equal  proportions,  dolomite  limestone.  Limestones are either granular or compact.

2.3.7     Granular limestone
Consists  of  grains  of  carbonate  of  lime,  cemented  together  by  some  compound  of  lime,  silica,  and  alumina.  The  grains  are  generally  sea  shells  or  fragments  of  shells  and  are  often  mixed  with  sand.  This kind of stone is always porous.  It  is  found  in  various  colours,  especially  white  and  yellowish  brown.  In  many  cases,  it  is  so  soft  when  first  quarried  that  it  can  be  cut  with  a  knife;  it  hardens,  however,  on  exposure  to  the  air.

The  variety  of  granular  limestone  called  oolitic  limestone  is  composed  of  egg-shaped  grains  cemented  together.  It  is  one  of  the  most  important  of  the  limestone  group  and  is  extensively  quarried  and  widely  used  for  building  purposes.  Each  grain  is  usually  of  concentric  structure,  the  carbonate  of  lime  enclosing  a  particle  of  sand  or  of  some  substance  of  either  animal  or  vegetable  origin.

2.3.8     Compact limestone
Consists  of  carbonate  of  lime,  either  pure  or  mixed  with  sand  or  clay.  This  kind  of  limestone  is  generally  devoid  of  crystalline  structure,  and  has  a  dull,  earthy  appearance  and  a  dark-blue,  gray,  black,  or  mottled  colour.  In  some  cases,  however,  it  is  crystalline  and  full  of  organic  remains;  it  is  then  known  as  crystalline  limestone.

The  compact  limestones  are  easily  worked  with  the  saw  and  hammer.  They  resemble  light  granite  in  appearance,  and  are  extensively  used  for  building  purposes.  The  variety  called  shelly  limestone,  which  consists  of  fossil  shells  that  are  cemented  together,  is  sufficiently  hard  to  take  a  polish;  it  is  much  used  for  interior  ornamentation.  The  condition  of  the  minerals  combined  with  the  lime  also  furnishes  a  basis  for  distinguishing  names.  Thus,  the  stone  is  called  hornstone  when  very  fine  grained  silica  is  present;  cherty  limestone,  when  the  silica  is  in  the  form  of  rounded  masses  or  nodules;  ironstone,  when  the  amount  of  iron  and  clay  is  greater  than  the  amount  of  lime;  rottenstone,  when  the  ironstone  is  decomposed;  and  hydraulic  limestone,  when  the  rock  contains  silica  and  clay  in  nearly  equal  proportions.

2.3.9     Shale
Shale  is  a  typical  clay  rock  that  splits  readily  in  lines  parallel  to  the  bedding.  Sand  and  lime  carbonate  are  always  present  in  this  stone  and,  with  increase  of  either,  the  rock  grades  into  shaly  sandstone  or  shaly  limestone.  Shale  is  used  for  light  traffic  roads  and  in  the  manufacture  of  brick,  tile,  and  other  burned  clay  products,  but  it  is  not  suitable  for  concrete  aggregate.

2.3.10   Conglomerate
Stratified  rock  composed  of  rounded  pebbles  of  any  material,  such  as  limestone,  quartz,  shale,  granite  grains,  feldspar,  etc.,  cemented  together  is  known  as  conglomerate.  When  the  pebbles  are  quartz  with  siliceous  binding  the  rock  is  strong  and  hard  to  quarry  or  dress.  When  the  interstices  between  the  pebbles  are  not  filled  by  the  binder,  the  rock  is  very  porous,  and  may  hold  great  amounts  of  ground  water.  This stone is seldom used in building construction.

 

Metamorphic Rocks 
2.3.11   Marble
Metamorphosed limestone gives the masonry material known as marble.  It  is  easily  dressed  to  a  smooth  surface  and  polished,  and  is  considered  one  of  the  most  valuable  building  materials.  It  resists  frost  and  moisture  well,  but  like  all  limestones  it  does  not  withstand  fire.

Marble  can  be  obtained  in  many  colours,  some  of  which  are  white,  gray,  red,  blue,  green,  and  black.  One  of  the  most  important  characteristics  of  marble  is  that  it  is  easy  to  carve;  the  finer  the  grains  of  the  stone,  the  more  suitable  it  is  for  this  purpose.  The  fine  white-grained  varieties  that  are  especially  prized  for  sculpture  are  called  saccharoid  marbles.
Some  of  the  finest  varieties  of  white  American  marble  are  found  at  Lee,  Massachusetts,  and  in  the  vicinity  of  Rutland,  Vermont.  The  dark-blue  marble  from  the  Vermont  quarries  is  very  durable  and  has  a  close  grain.  A  fine  black  marble  is  quarried  at  Glens  Falls,  New  York.  Coloured  marbles,  including  gray,  light  and  dark  pink,  buff,  chocolate,  etc.,  are  found  in  Tennessee,  Georgia,  and  other  states.

2.3.12   Slate
Slate is a laminated rock of great hardness and density.  It splits readily along planes called planes of slaty cleavage.  This  facility  of  cleavage  is  one  of  the  most  valuable  characteristics  of  slate,  as  masses  can  be  split  into  slabs  and  plates  of  small  thickness  and  great  area.

The  most  common  colours  of  slat  are  dark  blue,  bluish  black,  purplish  gray,  bluish  gray,  and  green;  occasionally,  red  and  cream-colored  slates  are  also  found.  Some  slates  are  marked  with  bands  or  patches  whose  colour  is  different  from  that  of  the  rest  of  the  stone.  These  marks  do  not  affect  the  durability  of  the  slate,  but  they  spoil  its  appearance.

Although  slate  is  not  strictly  a  building  stone,  it  is  used  extensively  for  covering  steps  and  the  roofs  of  buildings,  for  wall  linings,  and  for  sanitary  purposes.  Slate  is  sometimes  used  to  make  light  traffic  macadam,  but,  although  it  packs  well,  it  ultimately  yields  much  mud  and  dust,  which  are  objectionable.

2.3.13   Schist
Schist  has  a  more  crystalline  structure  than  slate,  and  the  crystals  are  easily  seen.  It  is  composed  chiefly  of  minerals  that  cleave  readily,  such  as  hornblende,  mica,  etc.,  mixed  with  a  variable  amount  of  granular  quartz  and  feldspar.  The  presence  of  the  cleavage  minerals  produces  a  fine  cleavage  or  foliation,  called  schistosity.

Schist  is  sometimes  used  in  building  construction  but  it  disintegrates  very  rapidly  and  is  not  durable.  It  should  always  be  set  with  the  planes  of  schistosity  horizontal.

2.3.14   Gneiss
Gneiss  is  a  coarse-grained,  laminated  rock,  formed  by  metamorphism  of  either  sedimentary  or  igneous  rock.  It  is  often  used  as  structural  material  and  as  concrete  aggregate.


PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF STONE
The  physical  characteristics  of  a  particular  stone  must  be  suitable  for  its  intended  use.  It  is  important  to  determine  the  physical  properties  of  the  actual  stone  being  used  rather  than  using  values  from  a  generic  table,  which  can  be  very  misleading.  Considerations  of  the  physical  properties  of  the  stone  being  selected  include  modulus  of  rupture,  shear  strength,  coefficient  of  expansion,  permanent  irreversible  growth  and  change  in  shape,  creep  deflection,  compressive  strength,  modulus  of  elasticity,  moisture  resistance,  and  weatherability.  Epoxy  adhesives,  often  used  with  stone,  are  affected  by  cleanliness  of  surfaces  to  be  bonded  and  ambient  temperature.  Curing  time  increases  with  cold  temperatures  and  decreases  with  warmer  temperatures.

Fabrication and Installation
With  the  introduction  of  new  systems  of  fabrication  and  installation  and  recent  developments  in  the  design  and  detailing  of  stone  cutting,  support,  and  anchorage,  costs  are  better  controlled.  Correct  design  of  joints,  selection  of  mortars,  and  use  of  sealants  affect  the  quality  and  durability  of  installation.  Adequate  design  and  detailing  of  the  anchorage  of  each  piece  of  stone  are  required.  The  size  and  thickness  of  the  stone  should  be  established  based  on  physical  properties  of  the  stone,  its  method  of  anchorage,  and  the  loads  it  must  resist.  Appropriate  safety  factors  should  be  developed  based  on  the  variability  of  the  stone  properties  as  well  as  other  considerations  such  as  imperfect  workmanship,  method  of  support  and  anchorage,  and  degree  of  exposure  of  the  cladding  installation.  Relieving  angles  for  stone  support  and  anchorage  may  be  necessary  to  preclude  unacceptable  loading  of  the  stone.  The  stone  should  be  protected  from  staining  and  breakage  during  shipment,  delivery,  and  installation.
Since  stone  cladding  design  and  detailing  vary  with  type  of  stone  and  installation,  the  designer  should  consult  stone  suppliers,  stone-setting  specialty  contractors,  industry  standards  (such  as  ASTM),  and  other  publications  to  help  select  and  implement  a  stone  cladding  system.

Stone Classified According To Quality Affecting Use
We  can  find  out  the  properties  and  use  of  different  types  of  stones  depending  upon  the   texture,  special  features,  parting  and  hardness  for  use  in  building.  This can be seen as under the table 5.1

Stone Bedding

 Stone bedding diagram

Fig 5.1 Stone Bedding according to fracture

 

Table 5.1 Stone Classified According To Quality Affecting Use

 Stone Classified according to Qualities affecting use.

 

Table 5.2 Physical Properties of Representative Stones 

 Phisical Properties of representative Stones

 

Weight  of  Different  Materials

Table 5.3 Weight of different materials

 Table - Weight of different materials

 

Table 5.4 Weight of different materials

 Table - brick and block masonry - weights of different materials

 

PROPERTIES OF SOME IMPORTANT STONES OF RAJASTHAN

Sandstones
The  Lower  Blander  sandstone  is  usually  medium  to  fine  grained,  purple,  reddish-brown  in  colour  with  pale  white  bands  and  is  compact,  massive  and  having  quadrangular  joints.  The  Upper  Blander  sandstone  is  reddish-brown  in  colour  with  cream  spots.  Jhalarapatan  sandstone  is  fine-grained,  hard,  compact  and  of  different  colours  such  as  white  to  buff-grey,  red,  cream  and  is  acid  proof.  Jodhpur  sandstone  is  coarse  to  medium  grained,  red  and  buff  white  in  colour.  Khatu  sandstone  is  fine  grained,  creamish-white  in  colour  and  is  specially  famous  for  carving  and  used  for  making  fine,  perforated  windows  and  jallies.  The  physical  &  chemical  properties  of  Rajasthan  sandstone  are  given  in  table  5.5  and  table  5.6

Table 5.5 Technical Information of different Sandstones


Properties

Jodhpur

Karauli

Dholpur

Bijoliyan

Density  (Kg/m  3)

2.42

2.38

2.40

2.44

Water Absorption (%)

1.25

1.20

1.20

1.20

Modulus  of  Rupture 
(Kg/cm  3)

220

210

208

204

Compressive  Strength 
(  Kg/cm  3)

390

358

460

750

Colour

Red,  Pink,  Buff,  Brown

Table 5.6 Chemical Properties of different Sandstones


Properties

Area

Percentage

Jodhpur

Karauli

Dholpur

Bijoliyan

SiO2

96.60

96.20

98.20

97.24

Fe2O3

1.20

0.80

0.84

0.96

Al2O3

1.00

1.20

0.32

0.84

CaO

0.28

0.40

0.28

0.28

MgO

0.20

0.20

Nil

Nil

L.O.I.

0.50

0.60

0.20

0.20

 

Marble
Table 5.7 Technical Information of different Marbles


Technical  Information  of  Marble 

Technical  Details

Water  Absorption,  %  by  weight

Density,  bulk  specific  gravity

Modulus  of  rupture,  N/mm2

Compressive  strength  N/mm2

Abrasion  resistance  to  wear

Flexural  strength,  N/mm2

ASTM/Indian  Standard

C-97

C-97

C-99

C-170

IS  1237  Guidelines

IS  4860  Guidelines

Area

 

 

Dry

Wet

Dry

Wet

Avg.  Wear  mm

Max.  Wear  mm

 

Makrana 

0.04

2.68

14

16

88

81

3.1

3.2

16

Andhi  Indo

0.05

2.68

13

11

130

109

6.6

6.8

11

Andhi 
Modern  art

0.08

2.68

14

17

94

114

3.8

4.1

16

Jhiri  Onyx

0.06

2.68

9.00

8

142

108

5.5

5.7

8

Agaria,  Rajnagar

0.06

2.84

17

16

106

102

4.0

4.2

15

Morwad,  Rajnagar

0.04

2.84

12

13

111

80

3.1

3.2

13

Keshariyaji  Green

0.07

2.66

42

35

286

194

1.1

1.2

35

Bidasar

2.38-2.43

2.55-2.47

19-24

13-20

138-114

83-81

1.45

1.6

12-20

Phalodi

0.64

2.62

15

21

212

116

2.0

2.2

20

 

Table 5.8 Chemical Properties of different Marbles


Marble  Area

CaO

MgO

SiO2

Fe2O3

LOI

Jhiri,  Altar

26-33

21-25

0.01-3.18

0.73-1.01

40-47

Tripura  Sungari,  Batswana

32

23-24

<=23.4

0.200.84

42-44

Mondale,  Chittaurgarh

35.92

3.01

18.52

2.93

33.18

Sandwa,  Churu

31-37

13-22.6

<=6.44

0.12-0.26

45-46

Dungarpur

48.18

2.04

10.75

1.13

35.55

Bhainslana,  Jaipur

48-54

2-4

1-3

1.5-3

35-45

Phalodi,  Jodhpur

39.03

9.36

8.70

0.48

42.83

Makrana,  Nagaur

50-56

0.8-1.8

0.33-1.20

0.10-0.28

34.8-43.2

Rajnagar

30-33

16-25

0.01-7.6

0.12-0.95

36-44

Sirohi

51.49

0.90

8.52

0.54

39.36

Keshariyaji,  Udaipur

18.56

21.29

31.51

5.33

21.82

Babarmal,  Udaipur

20.79

2.21

14.35

0.28

24.00

 

Classification
Marble  has  been  classified  into  10  groups  by  Bureau  of  Indian  Standards  (Indian  Standard  Institute  i.e.  ISI)  (IS  1130-1969)  on  the  basis  of  colour,  shade  and  pattern.  Rajasthan  is  the  most  fortunate  state  where  all  the  10  groups  specified  below  are  occurring  : 

Table 5.9 Types of Marbles

1.  Plain  White  Marble

2.  Panther  Marble

3.  White  Veined  Marble

4.  Plain  Black  Marble

5.  Black  Zebra  Marble

6.  Green  Marble

7.  Pink  Adanga  Marble

8.  Pink  Marble

9.  Grey  Marble 

10.  Brown  Marble

 

Granites
Table 5.10 Technical Information of different Granites


Technical  Information  of  Granite

Technical  Details

Water  Absorption,  %  by  weight

Density,  bulk  specific  gravity

Modulus  of  rupture,  N/mm2

Compressive  strength  N/mm2

Abrasion  resistance  to  wear

Flexural  strength,  N/mm2

ASTM/Indian  Standard

C-97

C-97

C-99

C-170

IS  1237  Guidelines

IS  4860  Guidelines

Area

 

 

Dry

Wet

Dry

Wet

Avg.  Wear  mm

Max.  Wear  mm

 

Bala  Flower,  Jalore

0.44

2.61

23

22

203

184

0.6

0.7

20

Chima  Pink,  Jalore

0.73

2.62

11

13

140

119

0.6

0.7

13

Copper  Silk  Jalore

0.04

2.63

17

20

148

119

0.7

0.9

19

Golden  Pearl,  Jalore

0.07

2.64

13

14

186

152

0.7

0.8

14

Imperial  Pink,  Jalore

0.15

2.65

11

15

117

100

0.6

0.7

14

Rosy  Pink,  Jalore

0.09

2.62

14

18

125

118

0.6

0.7

16

Royal  Touch,  Jalore

0.12

2.63

17

19

123

123

0.5

0.6

18

Sunrise  Yellow,  Jalore

0.12

2.62

13

14

142

102

0.8

0.9

12

Merry  Gold,  Barmer

0.7

2.61

15

14

125

109

0.8

1.0

14

Rakhee  Green,  Barmer

0.10

2.71

11

13

134

132

0.7

0.8

13

Royal  Cream,  Barmer

0.22

2.59

17

18

141

171

0.6

0.7

15

P.White,  Pali

0.20

2.65

11

11

142

133

0.9

1.00

11

 

Classification

Granites  are  classified  under  four  grades  depending  upon  the  compressive  strength  and  abrasive  resistance  as  specified  below

Table 5.11 classification of Granites


Designation  Grade

Compressive Strength
(kg/cm2  min.)

Abrasion  Value 
(%  max.)

A

2,200

32

B

1,800

36

C

1,400

40

D

1,000

45

 

DISINTEGRATION  OF  STONE
Disintegrating  Agents

5.8.1     Classification of Agents

The  disintegration  or  decay  of  stone  is  commonly  referred  to  as  weathering,  and  is  caused  by  agents  of  three  kinds;  namely,  physical  or  mechanical,  chemical  and  organic.  The  mechanical  agents  are  heat  and  cold,  air  in  the  form  of  wind,  and  water  in  the  form  of  rain  and  ice.  The  chemical  agents  are  the  various  acids  present  in  the  atmosphere.  The  organic  agents  are  vegetable  growths  that  thrive  in  damp  and  shady  places,  and  marine  insects  or  boring  molluscs,  which  perforate  the  stone  between  the  high  and  low  water  marks.

5.8.2     Heat and Cold

An  increase  in  temperature  causes  expansion  in  a  stone,  and  a  decrease  in  temperature  causes  contraction;  hence,  as  a  result  of  ordinary  changes  in  temperature,  there  is  a  continual  slight  movement  among  the  particles  of  the  stone,  which  may  destroy  their  cohesion,  and  thus  produce  a  slow  and  gradual  disintegration.

5.8.3     Fire

All  building  stones  are  injured  by  high  temperatures.  Sandstones,  if  somewhat  porous,  uncrystallised,  and  free  from  feldspar,  are  the  most  refractory  of  the  common  building  stones.  Gneiss  is  quite  fire  resistive  when  it  contains  a  large  proportion  of  quartz  in  which  the  particles  are  of  the  nature  of  sand.  Limestones  and  granitic  rocks  usually  crack  when  subjected  to  a  high  temperature.

Stone  is  subjected  to  a  very  severe  test  when  it  is  heated  during  a  fire  and  then  cooled  suddenly  by  a  stream  of  water  from  a  hose  The  exterior  layer  of  the  stone  is  cooled  much  more  rapidly  than  the  interior,  and  in  some  cases  the  uneven  rate  of  contraction  causes  large  pieces  to  break  off.

5.8.4     Air  and  Water
Air  acts  mechanically  in  the  form  of  wind,  especially  when  it  carries  dust;  it  erodes  the  surface  and  removes  small  particles,  much  in  the  Same  way  as  a  sandblast  apparatus,  thus,  exposing  new  surfaces  to  be  acted  on.  Rain  alone  has  a  slight  mechanical  effect  when  simply  falling  on  the  stone  and  washing  loose  particles  away.  Rain  and  wind  together,  however,  act  very  energetically.

Water  penetrates  into  all  rocks,  no  matter  how  dense  or  compact  they  may  be,  and,  when  it  freezes,  it  expands  and  tends  to  split  them.  A  volume  of  water  occupying  100  cubic  inches  before  freezing  would  occupy  109  cubic  inches  after  freezing.  When  this  expansion  is  resisted,  the  pressure  exerted  is  equal  to  150  tons  per  square  foot,  which  is  sufficient  to  split  the  strongest  rocks.

Also  act  together  to  produce  the  following  changes  in  the  composition  of  stones:  (1)  rusting  or  oxidation  of  the  iron  particles  present  in  the  stone;  (2)  reduction  or  de  oxidation  of  the  oxygen  in  iron  oxide,  which  is  caused  by  the  presence  of  an  organic  acid  or  of  continual  moisture;  (3)  absorption  of  water  by  an  oxide;  (4)  solution  of  the  constituents  that  are  soluble  in  water.  Absorption  occurs  only  when  there  is  continual  moisture,  as  in  bridge  piers  and  abutments.

5.8.5     Acids
Pure  water  has  but  little  effect  in  dissolving  the  ingredients  of  stone,  but  the  air  contains  many  acids  which,  in  combination  with  rain,  form  powerful  solvents  of  mineral  matter.  The  stones  that  are  most  susceptible  to  this  dissolving  action  are  limestone,  sandstone,  and  granite  containing  feldspar.

5.8.5.1   Carbonic  acid

It  is  contained  in  the  atmosphere  to  the  amount  of  about  400  parts  of  acid  to  1,000,000  parts  of  air,  has,  when  combined  with  water,  a  corroding  action  on  the  carbonates,  whether  they  form  the  principal  constituents  of  the  stone  or  are  only  present  as  cementing  materials.  This  acid  transforms  the  insoluble  earthy  carbonates  of  lime  and  magnesia  into  bicarbonates,  which  are  soluble  in  water  and  can,  therefore,  be  washed  away.  On  granite,  carbonic  acid  acts  by  eliminating  the  alkaline  constituents  in  the  form  of  carbonates;  a  friable  or  crumbly  residue  of  hydrated  silicate  of  alumina  is  left,  which  contains  the  unaltered  particles  of  quartz  and  mica.  In  the  case  of  greenstones  the  acid  acts  on  the  iron  present,  and  also  dissolves  out  the  lime,  leaving  a  loose,  friable,  and  bulky  stone  of  a  red  or  brown  colour.  Sandstones  containing  iron  are  disintegrated  by  the  solution  and  washing  away  of  the  iron.

5.8.5.2   Nitric  acid 

It is  frequently  present  as  a  constituent  of  the  atmosphere;  its  destructive  action  is  exerted  on  the  limestones.

5.8.5.3  Sulphuric  acid
It   results  from  the  combustion  of  coal,  is  present  in  the  atmosphere  of  cities  to  an  extent  as  great  as  250  parts  in  1,000,000.  It  has  a  marked  destructive  influence  on  all  stones,  and  especially  on  granite.  The  feldspar  is  attacked,  and  the  potash,  soda,  or  lime  is  dissolved  out,  and  in  time  the  stone  becomes  filled  with  small  holes.

5.8.6  Living  Agents

The  disintegration  and  decay  of  stone  by  the  inanimate  agents  are  frequently  hastened  by  many  forms  of  life,  such  as  bacteria,  mosses,  worms,  etc.,  all  of  which  are  in  a  sense  destructive  agents.  Their  presence  gives  rise  to  small  amounts  of  organic  acids  which  exercise  a  corrosive  influence.

5.9        CONDITIONS  AFFECTING  DISINTEGRATION
5.9.1    Quarrying
Disintegration  of  stone  is  hastened  or  retarded  by  the  methods  employed  in  quarrying,  seasoning,  finishing,  and  setting  the  stone.

The  excessive  use  of  explosives  in  quarrying  shatters  the  cohesion  of  the  particles  composing  the  stone  and  causes  cracks  and  flaws  that  make  the  stone  more  permeable  to  moisture.  Small  charges  of  powder,  uniformly  distributed  over  the  area  to  be  blasted,  have  a  lesser  weakening  effect  on  the  stone.  Stone  cut  out  by  quarrying  machinery  is  preferable  to  that  blasted  or  wedged  out,  because  the  stone  is  not  jarred  and  cracked  by  this  method  and  because  denser  faces  are  produced  which  render  the  stone  less  permeable  to  moisture.

The  position  of  the  stone  in  the  quarry  also  affects  its  durability.  Stone  taken  from  the  exposed  faces  and  the  top  ledges  of  the  quarry  is  likely  to  be  less  durable  than  unexposed  stone.

5.9.2    Seasoning

Before  a  stone  is  placed  in  a  structure,  the  interstitial  moisture,  called  quarry  water  or  sap,  must  be  removed  by  evaporation.  This  process  is  termed  seasoning,  and  should  be  effected  by  exposing  the  stone  to  the  drying  action  of  the  atmosphere  for  some  months;  the  stone  should  be  stored  under  cover  for  protection  against  rain.  If  the  stone  is  not  seasoned,  the  quarry  water  will  be  alternately  frozen  and  thawed  during  a  series  of  years,  and  the  stone  will  be  broken  up.

5.9.3     Finishing

The  life  of  a  stone  is  dependent  on  the  style  of  finish  given  to  its  exposed  faces.  A  smooth  or  polished  surface  aids  in  prolonging  the  life  by  facilitating  the  rapid  discharge  of  rainwater.  The  methods  employed  in  dressing  the  stone  also  affect  its  life.  Minute  fissures  that  render  the  stone  more  susceptible  to  atmospheric  influences  are  produced  by  impact;  hence,  stones  sawed  to  the  required  dimensions  are  more  durable  than  those  hammered  and  broken  to  size.

5.9.4     Setting

The  position  in  which  the  stone  is  set  in  the  structure  affects  its  ability  to  resist  disintegration.  When  stratified  stones  are  placed  on  edge,  and  the  mortar  joints  are  not  properly  filled,  water  enters  between  the  layers  and  in  freezing  causes  the  stone  to  scale  off;  therefore,  laminated  stones  should  be  set  with  their  layers  horizontal.

The  portions  of  a  structure  most  liable  to  early  decay  are  those  under  cornices,  belt  courses,  window  sills,  etc.,  on  which  the  rainwater  slowly  falls  or  drips.  As  a  protection  from  this  source  of  decay,  the  under  surface  of  a  projecting  stone  should  have  a  narrow  groove,  called  a  drip,  extending  its  whole  length.  The  water  that  collects  on  the  upper  surface  of  the  projection  flows  over  the  upper  edge  and  down  the  face  to  the  under  side,  where  its  further  progress  is  interrupted  by  the  drip;  it  then  falls  to  the  ground.

6.1        CONCLUSION
Stones are versatile material.  In  order  to  be  able  to  decide  what  kind  of  stone  to  used  under  given  conditions,  knowledge  of  the  different  kinds  employed  in  the  various  types  of  construction  is  essential.  It  is  not  necessary  to  determine  the  exact  composition  of  a  stone  to  be  used  in  a  structure,  but  knowledge  should  be  sufficient  to  help  in  selecting  or  specifying  the  stone  best  adapted  to  the  type  of  structure.

The  properties  of  a  stone  that  determine  its  fitness  for  construction  purposes  are  durability,  strength,  hardness,  density,  and  appearance.  The  quality  of  a  stone  is  ascertained  approximately  from  a  study  of  its  origin  and  chemical  composition  and  from  the  results  of  tests  and  experiments.

6.2        Inferences
Stones  are  used  as  versatile  material  irrespective  of  the  properties  of  it,  still  its  use  remain  as  same,  varying  the  techniques  of  implementation  and  limitations.

6.3        SELECTION  OF  BUILDING  STONES
For  selection  of  the  stone  should  be  done  on  the  basis  of:

6.3.1     Importance of  Preliminary  Investigation.
When  an  important  masonry  structure  is  to  be  built,  it  is  essential  to  select  a  stone  that  is  strong  and  durable.  Probably  nothing  in  engineering  construction  is  so  neglected  as  the  preliminary  inspection  of  building  stone.

If  it  is  necessary  to  employ  great  quantities  of  building  stone  at  points  where,  the  stability  of  the  structure  depends  on  the  strength  of  the  stone,  an  inspection  of  the  quarry  from  which  the  stone  is  to  be  obtained  should  be  made.  The  engineer  should  also  inspect  some  building  or  structure  which  contains  the  same  material  and  has  been  standing  for  a  long  time.  It  is  well,  however,  not  to  depend  wholly  on  inspection  either  at  the  quarry  or  at  a  building,  but  to  subject  the  stone  also  to  laboratory  investigation.

6.3.2     Inspection of  Stone  at  Quarry.
Careful  inspection  at  the  quarry  will  frequently  reveal  much  information  regarding  the  durability  and  uniformity  of  the  stone.  Exposed  quarry  faces  will  sometimes  indicate  the  weathering  properties  of  the  stone,  as  well  as  its  liability  to  disintegration  caused  by  moisture  and  running  water  containing  injurious  acids  and  alkalis.
The  various  grades  of  stone  to  be  had,  and  the  amount  of  each  grade,  can  be  determined.  In  first-class  work  it  is  imperative  that  only  the  best  grade  of  the  quarry  should  be  employed,  and  it  is  important  to  find  out  whether  a  sufficient  quantity  of  stone  of  satisfactory  texture  and  colour  is  available  to  supply  the  amount  of  material  required  for  the  work.

6.3.3     Inspection  of  Stone  in  Buildings.
By  inspecting  stone  that  has  been  in  place  in  a  building  or  structure  for  a  considerable  length  of  time,  an  excellent  idea  may  be  had  of  its  weathering  properties.  If,  after  years  of  exposure  in  the  atmosphere  of  an  industrial  city  situated  in  the  temperate  zone,  the  building  stone  shows  no  disintegration  and  has  retained  its  original  lustre  and  colour,  except  for  the  soil  of  dust  and  smoke  stains,  it  certainly  can  be  considered  of  the  best  structural  value  for  building  purposes.  If  a  stone  from  a  certain  quarry  shows  poor  weathering  qualities  in  a  structure,  an  investigation  should  be  made  to  determine  whether  the  best  grade  from  the  quarry  has  been  used,  before  the  product  of  the  quarry  is  condemned.

6.3.4     Laboratory  Investigation.
Although  the  quarry  and  building  inspections  are  of  the  utmost  practical  importance,  they  should,  as  previously  stated,  be  augmented  by  laboratory  investigation.  When  the  stone  to  be  used  is  from  a  new  quarry,  the  characteristics  of  the  product  are  little  known,  and  this  investigation  is  then  necessary.  The  laboratory  investigation  of  stone  usually  consists  of  chemical  analysis,  microscopic  examination,  and  mechanical  tests.

The  chemical  analysis  determines  both  qualitatively  and  quantitatively  the  chemical  constituents  of  the  stone.  In  a  qualitative  analysis,  the  mineral  elements  and  chemical  combinations  comprising  the  stone,  together  with  the  impurities  and  organic  matter,  are  determined.  The  quantitative  analysis  shows  the  proportions  of  the  different  elements  and  chemical  combinations.  When  the  chemical  composition  of  a  stone  is  determined  in  this  way,  conclusions  can  usually,  though  not  always,  be  drawn  as  to  the  durability  and  the  weathering  properties  of  the  stone.

The  microscopic  examination  of  building  stone  is  not  only  less  expensive  but  also  more  important  than  the  chemical  analysis,  for  by  it  is  revealed  the  structure  of  the  stone.  By  the  microscope  may  be  observed  the  size  and  shape  of  the  particles  or  crystals  composing  the  stone,  their  relative  closeness,  and  the  character  and  compactness  of  the  cementing  material  holding  them  together.  Usually,  the  mineral  constituents  of  the  stone  may  be  determined  by  microscopic  examination,  and  frequently  their  proportions  and  the  percentage  of  impurities  contained  in  the  stone  may  be  estimated.  In  addition,  the  microscope  reveals  flaws  in  the  structure,  such  as  cracks,  cavities,  incipient  fractures,  and  gas  bubbles.

The  mechanical  tests  of  a  stone  furnish  data  from  which  a  fair  estimate  of  the  durability  may  be  made.  The  purpose  of  these  tests  is  to  impose  on  the  stone,  as  nearly  as  possible,  conditions  that  in  the  course  of  a  few  hours  or  a  few  weeks  will  approximate  the  effect  produced  by  actual  use  during  a  period  of  years.

 

Table  6.1  Preferable  use of  different  types  of  Sandstones

Sandstone

 

 

Different  types  of  stones  and  their  preferable  use  in  building

S.  No.

Building  Elements

Jodhpur

Karauli

Dholpur

Bijoliyan

Marble

Granite

1

Foundation

yes

No

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

2

Plinth

yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

3

Frames 

yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

4

Lintel

yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

5

Chajja

yes

Yes

No

No

Yes

No

6

Wall

yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

7

Column/pillar 

yes

Yes

No

No

Yes

No

8

Arches

yes

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

No

9

Beam

yes

No

No

No

No

No

10

Bracket

yes

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

No

11

Slab

yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

12

Parapet

yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

13

Cladding

yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

14

Aesthetics

yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

Table  6.2  Preferable  use of  different  types  of  Granite


Granite

 

 

Different types of stones and their preferable use in building

S. No.

Building Elements

Bala Flower, Jalore

Chima Pink, Jalore

Copper Silk Jalore

Golden Pearl, Jalore

Imperial Pink, Jalore

Rosy Pink, Jalore

Royal Touch, Jalore

Sunrise Yellow, Jalore

Merry Gold, Barmer

Rakhee Green, Barmer

Royal Cream, Barmer

P.White, Pali

1

Foundation

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

2

Plinth

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

3

Frames

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

4

Lintel

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

5

Chajja

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

6

Wall

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

7

Column/
pillar

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

8

Arches

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

9

Beam

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

10

Bracket

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

11

Slab

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

12

Parapet

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

13

Cladding

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

14

Aesthetics

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

Table  6.3  Preferable  use of  different  types  of  Marble


Marble

 

 

Different types of stones and their preferable use in building

S. No.

Building
Elements

Makrana

Andhi
Indo

Andhi
Modern
art

Jhiri
Onyx

Agaria,
Rajnagar

Morwad,
Rajnagar

Keshariyaji
Green

Bidasar

Phalodi

1

Foundation

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

2

Plinth

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

3

Frames

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

4

Lintel

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

5

Chajja

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

6

Wall

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

7

Column/pillar

No

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

Arches

No

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

Beam

No

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10

Bracket

No

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11

Slab

No

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12

Parapet

No

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13

Cladding

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

14

Aesthetics

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

 


Back to Top